Gold

Gold’s purity is measured in karats. The term “karat” harks back to the ancient bazaars where “carob” beans were used to weigh precious metals. 24 karat is pure gold, but its purity means it is more expensive and less durable than gold that is alloyed with other metals. Different alloys are used in jewelry for greater strength, durability and color range.

The karatage of the jewelry will tell you what percentage of gold it contains: 24 karat is 100 percent, 18 karat is 75 percent, and 14 karat is 58 percent gold. With gold jewelry, the higher the number of karats, the greater the value.

Other important factors to consider are the jewelry’s construction and design. Hand crafting or textural interest raises the cost. Similar looking pieces may have vastly different price tags. This is because different pieces may have specific characteristics that make them unique. So look carefully to notice any differences and similarities. Often, it’s these small details that give you pleasure through the years that you enjoy a piece of jewelry

Gold Colours

Yellow gold is alloyed with silver and copper. It is the most frequently used type of gold there is. Malleable, ductile, and generally non-corrosive, it has a high melting point and is not susceptible to compression.

White gold is alloyed with a large percentage of silver, or a selection of other white metals. The percentage of gold naturally varies, according to the amount of other metal used. White gold is highly reflective and not subject to tarnish. The ancient term for it was Electrum. Its use predates that of Palladium and Platinum.

Rose gold is alloyed with copper, and silver. Proportions are one part of copper to three parts of 24-karat gold.

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