Shape

Square Emerald Cut. From the popularity of the 1920s Art Deco period, the timeless elegance of the Emerald cut diamond still appeals today.Rectangular in shape with the corners removed, the Emerald cut is a step cut. It consists of a series of linear trapezoid facets, as steps on the pavilion and on the crown, stepping down from the table to the girdle.
This linear step cut design is desired for its simple beauty. The cool, clean lines of the Emerald cut suit classic and contemporary jewellery designs.

Pear Cut. The Pearshape is a modification of the Round Brilliant cut, sometimes also called the Teardrop. The arrangement of Brilliant facets is extended into a Pearshape outline, usually consisting of 58 facets. The dimensions of a Pearshape, as with other fancy shapes, are determined by the shape of the diamond crystal, from which it is cut. A Pearshape diamond of broader proportions can stand alone in a jewellery design, while an elongated shape is perfect for drop earrings.

Round Cut. The Round Brilliant cut is the classic diamond shape. From the sophisticated elegance of a solitary diamond to the dazzling brilliance of pave set stones, this cut is a favoured choice worldwide. A timeless beauty, it’s suited to classical and contemporary styles. Evolved from centuries of cutting history, the modern Round Brilliant cut marks the pinnacle of diamond cutting. It unlocks a diamond’s full potential by maximising brilliance, fire and scintillation. This 58-facet, symmetrical cut reveals the beauty within the diamond.

Cushion Cut. The Cushion cut is stunning as a solitaire, or as a three-stone set, creating an impressive display. Cushion cuts are sometimes referred to as pillow cuts because the softened edge of the squarish Oval shape resembles a pillow. Previously favoured throughout the 19th century, the Cushion cut has recently had a resurgence in popularity. The modern Cushion cut has been revised, and is based on the 58 facet modern Round Brilliant cut. The antique feel and understated look is reminiscent of a bygone era.

Oval Cut. The Oval diamond shape was invented in the early 1960s as a modification of the Round Brilliant cut. It usually consists of 56 facets. Admired for its classic beauty, the Oval offers an alternative to the evenness of the Round. This graceful shape is flattering as a solitaire or may be incorporated into a graduating set of oval diamonds. It is usually oriented to accentuate the longitudinal aspect. But ovals can also be placed horizontally, giving a broad flash of diamond.

Emerald Cut. From the popularity of the 1920s Art Deco period, the timeless elegance of the Emerald cut diamond still appeals today.Rectangular in shape with the corners removed, the Emerald cut is a step cut. It consists of a series of linear trapezoid facets, as steps on the pavilion and on the crown, stepping down from the table to the girdle. This linear step cut design is desired for its simple beauty. The cool, clean lines of the Emerald cut suit classic and contemporary jewellery designs.

Princess Cut. The Princess cut is a modified Brilliant cut. At the time of its development in the late 1970s, Princess cuts were considered innovative and have since become one of the most popular contemporary diamond shapes. The Princess cut has a sharp-cornered, straight-edged, square or slightly rectangular form. It has Brilliant-style faceting. With up to as many as 76 facets, a well-proportioned Princess cut expresses amazing fire and brilliance.

Radient Cut. First developed in the 1970s, the Radiant cut is considered a modified Brilliant. It is a mixed cut, combining elements of both step-cut and Brilliant faceting. The Radiant cut merges linear elegance with sparkling brilliance. The crown of the Radiant retains the cut corners and step faceting of the Emerald cut. But some steps have additional cross-faceting. The pavilion has Brilliant faceting similar to that of the Princess cut, with different faceting extending from the cut corners.

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